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May 14 2020

Django 3.1 alpha 1 released

Django 3.1 alpha 1 is now available. It represents the first stage in the 3.1 release cycle and is an opportunity for you to try out the changes coming in Django 3.1.

Django 3.1 has a potpourri of new features which you can read about in the in-development 3.1 release notes.

This alpha milestone marks the feature freeze. The current release schedule calls for a beta release in about a month and a release candidate about a month from then. We'll only be able to keep this schedule if we get early and often testing from the community. Updates on the release schedule are available on the django-developers mailing list.

As with all alpha and beta packages, this is not for production use. But if you'd like to take some of the new features for a spin, or to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker), you can grab a copy of the alpha package from our downloads page or on PyPI.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

May 13 2020

Django Google Summer of Code Students 2020

For the 13th year, Django is participating in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program focused on bringing more student developers into open source software development. Over the years, the mentorship provided by Django community members and the effort of motivated students have led to major new features as well as overall improvements to the Django codebase.

In 2019, Sage Abdullah contributed a cross-database JSONField, which will be released as part of Django 3.1 in August.

And for 2020, two student proposals were selected for work over the summer:

  • Kacper Szmigiel, an undergraduate student at Technical University of Lodz in Poland, will work on a refactor of the mypy plugin that is part of django-stubs. His primary mentors are Nikita Sobolev and Artem Malyshev, maintainers of django-stubs.
  • Ahmad A. Hussein, an undergraduate student German University in Cairo, will work to extend the parallel test runner to Windows, macOS, and add Oracle support. His primary mentors are Tom Forbes and Adam Johnson.

Additional mentors are Shai Berger, Simon Charette, Sage Abdullah, David Smith, Mariusz Felisiak, and Carlton Gibson.

Thank you to our Django community mentors and to Google for their continued support of this important program.

Sponsored post
 
 

May 04 2020

Django bugfix release: 3.0.6

Today we've issued the 3.0.6 bugfix release.

The release package and checksums are available from our downloads page, as well as from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

April 29 2020

PyCharm & DSF Campaign 2020 Results

For the fourth year in a row, JetBrains PyCharm  partnered with the Django Software Foundation on a promotion, “Get PyCharm, Support Django,” where for 28 days users could purchase new individual PyCharm Professional licenses for 30% while the full proceeds went to the DSF. Even with the current economic conditions the campaign was a huge success again this year.

"JetBrains PyCharm has been a major supporter of Django and the Django Software Foundation these past four years. The $40,000 raised during this year's campaign represents 20% of the DSF's annual budget, which goes directly into funding the continued development and support of Django via the Django Fellowship program and Django conferences worldwide. On behalf of the community, our deepest thanks to JetBrains PyCharm for their generous continued support." - Frank Wiles, DSF President

Django Software Foundation

The Django Software Foundation is the non-profit foundation that supports the development of the Django Web framework. It funds the Django Fellowship program, which currently supports two Fellows who triage tickets, review/merge patches from the community, and work on infrastructure. The introduction of this program starting in 2015 has gone a long way towards ensuring a consistent major release cycle and the fixing/blocking of severe bugs. DSF also funds development sprints, community events like DjangoCons, and related conferences and workshops globally.

Fundraising is still ongoing and you can donate directly at djangoproject.com/fundraising.

April 01 2020

Django bugfix releases issued: 3.0.5 and 2.2.12

Today we've issued 3.0.5 and 2.2.12 bugfix releases.

The release package and checksums are available from our downloads page, as well as from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Carlton Gibson: E17DF5C82B4F9D00.

Django 1.11 has reached the end of extended support.

Note that with this release, Django 1.11 has reached the end of extended support. All Django 1.11 users are encouraged to upgrade to Django 2.2 or later to continue receiving fixes for security issues.

See the downloads page for a table of supported versions and the future release schedule.

March 20 2020

DjangoCon Europe 2020 postponed to September

It is with a sincere heart that we have decided to postpone DjangoCon Europe 2020 to September 16-20.

As you might be aware, conferences are being cancelled worldwide. We still have hope, and before throwing the towel, we have decided to postpone. We took particular care to choose safe dates, far enough from the current outbreak peek estimates, but also far from the next fall/winter. Some experts state this is here to stay, and if they are correct, we should have troubles next fall/winter, let's just hope to a smaller degree.

Many of you have already bought tickets, and to those, we kindly ask to hope with us.

Ticket refunds will happen in any of the following scenarios:

  • Participant's inability to participate due to restrictions in place at the time or unavailability on the new dates.
  • Conference cancellation

Please do not rush requesting ticket refunds. We will process them as we can. Please note that a ticket refunded and latter on bought again has double the fees for us. So delay your decision for as long as you can. If everything goes well, we will have a conference, and we count on you to be there! When booking your trip to Porto for September, please make sure to book with the possibility to cancel.

For those of you who are planning or have already booked your flights with TAP, our official carrier, here is some crucial information. In short, they have plans for flight reschedules free of charge. You can reschedule your tickets to the new dates.

During the conference, we will follow the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, as well as the Portuguese Direcção Geral da Saude (DGS) guidelines.

Thank you for your understanding and patience during this uncertain time. We appreciate your support of this difficult decision and look forward to seeing you soon in September.

Hopping for the best,

The DjangoCon Europe 2020 Organisers

March 12 2020

New governance model for the Django project

For some time now, a proposal to change the governance of the Django open-source project has been under discussion and refinement. It was written up as a Django Enhancement Proposal (DEP), and numbered as DEP 10.

Changing the governance of the Django project is not something to do lightly, and not something that could be done lightly. It required the agreement of the Django core team, the Django Technical Board, and the Board of Directors of the Django Software Foundation. All of those groups have now held their deliberations, and voted to accept DEP 10.

In the coming weeks, implementation of DEP 10 will start in earnest, but today it's worth giving a quick summary of what's changing and why. For the full details you can also read the DEP (though keep in mind it's a governance document that tries to be as precise as possible and cover a lot of potential edge cases, and so is a bit long-winded and dry).

History and rationale

The Django open-source project was started by Adrian Holovaty and Jacob Kaplan-Moss, who also served as the first leaders of the project. They made the first few grants of commit access to other people back in the early days after Django was open-sourced, and the core team of committers had grown significantly by 2014, when Adrian and Jacob chose to step down from their leadership roles. At that time the basic structure, of a core team of committers who could add code to Django as they chose, was retained, and a new group -- a "Technical Board" of five committers, elected by the core committers -- was created to serve as an ultimate tie-breaking decision-maker.

In practice, however, almost all code added to Django now is merged by the Django Fellows -- paid contractors of the Django Software Foundation, whose responsibilities include triaging, reviewing, and merging pull requests to Django -- or by a small number of active volunteer committers. And all releases of Django are now issued by the Fellows, on schedules decided well in advance. Which means most of the historical "core team" of committers now have very little direct involvement with Django despite holding significant theoretical power within the project. And instead of committers discussing and deciding amongst themselves, nearly all technical decisions in Django's development are made by consensus on public forums where anyone can participate.

Additionally, the growth of that "core team" has slowed almost to a standstill; new committers are added only very rarely, and there's neither a clear path to "core" status nor any way for someone to tell whether they are, or could be, a good candidate for it. Discussions on project mailing lists and in-person at conferences have also indicated that many potential contributors measure themselves against an unrealistically low estimate of their own capabilities, and an unrealistically high estimate of the importance of the existing "core" developers, which has the effect of discouraging perfectly well-qualified people from attempting to get more seriously involved in contributing to Django.

All of this is frustrating for everyone, and not good for Django's long-term health as a project. Replacing or reforming "Django core" and the project's governance has thus become a perennial topic of long discussions, especially among the current "core" team and groups like the DSF membership.

What's changing

As of the adoption of DEP 10, the structure of the Django open-source project is changing in several ways. The former "core team" is now dissolved, and the commit access of the former "core" members will be removed. A new role -- "Merger" -- is being created, and will have commit access, but only to merge pull requests from others: Mergers cannot decide to add things to Django on their own initiative, and hold no special decision-making privileges.

Alongside this, a new role of "Releaser" is being created, and will have access to issue releases of Django and carry out the associated mechanics (like bumping version numbers in key files).

Technical decisions are already, in practice, made by consensus in public venues where anyone can participate; this is now formalized as the primary and expected way Django will be developed, and there will not be any special class of "committers" or "core" individuals with special power to commit or block something solely on their own say-so.

The Technical Board will be kept as a final decision-making authority for cases where this is needed -- which have historically come up only rarely -- and is also charged with canvassing for ideas and proposals for Django's future technical direction, and with setting the release schedule.

However, membership on the Technical Board will no longer be restricted to committers, and the Technical Board will no longer be elected by committers, which is necessary because the "core" committers, as a group, cease to exist. Instead, anyone who demonstrates a history of technical contributions to Django is eligible to run for the Technical Board, and the Technical Board will be elected by the DSF's Individual members, all of whom have been granted that membership based on their involvement with and contributions to Django (and there are provisions for non-DSF-member voters in the rare case where someone who's been involved with Django does not hold DSF membership). This expands Technical Board elections from having around 50 potential voters (with the old model of only committers voting) to currently nearly 200, and quite likely more as the DSF's membership grows.

Both the voter rolls, and the elections of the Technical Board, will be overseen by the Board of Directors of the DSF (with any DSF Board member who runs for the Technical Board having to abstain from involvement in election oversight), which will have the authority to investigate the qualifications and good faith of both candidates and voters.

Finally, the term "Django Core Developer" is being repurposed as an honorary title, bestowed by the DSF on individuals who've had major, long-term impact on the history of Django, similar to the "Fellow of the Python Software Foundation" honor bestowed by the PSF for contributions to Python. This title will be automatically granted to anyone who held "core" status -- in any of several forms, because that term has been nebulous on occasion -- at any time prior to DEP 10's adoption.

Effective immediately the Django Fellows, currently Carlton Gibson and Mariusz Felisiak, are the initial Mergers and Releasers, and the Django Technical Board will appoint additional people into those roles as needed to keep them properly staffed. The current Technical Board and the DSF Board also will work to hold the first election of a new Technical Board under DEP 10, which will be held once the necessary registration and voting infrastructure are in place.

There will also be a flurry of updates to documentation and other parts of the Django project website to ensure the new process and structure are described as accurately as possible. Until then, please refer people to this blog post for its summary of what's happening, or to the text of DEP 10 for the full details.

The future

Later this year we'll be celebrating the 15th anniversary of the original open-sourcing of Django. In that time, there have been 278 releases of the framework, nearly 1,900 people have contributed to the primary repository, and the number of people who've learned and used Django is nearly impossible to measure; the main django-users mailing list has tens of thousands of members, and is certain to represent only a fraction of the global Django-using community.

It's the hope of everyone who worked on this proposal that formally opening up Django's governance and decision-making will put the project on a healthier and more sustainable footing for the long term, and remove one of the barriers (the effective obsolescence of the "Django core" and stagnation of its membership) to welcoming new contributors to Django from all parts of its worldwide community.

March 04 2020

Django security releases issued: 3.0.4, 2.2.11, and 1.11.29

In accordance with our security release policy, the Django team is issuing Django 3.0.4, Django 2.2.11 and Django 1.11.29. These releases address the security issue detailed below. We encourage all users of Django to upgrade as soon as possible.

CVE-2020-9402: Potential SQL injection via tolerance parameter in GIS functions and aggregates on Oracle

GIS functions and aggregates on Oracle were subject to SQL injection, using a suitably crafted tolerance.

Thank you to Norbert Szetei of Doyensec for the report.

Affected supported versions

  • Django master branch
  • Django 3.0
  • Django 2.2
  • Django 1.11

Resolution

Patches to resolve the issue have been applied to Django's master branch and the 3.0, 2.2, and 1.11 release branches. The patches may be obtained from the following changesets:

The following releases have been issued:

The PGP key ID used for these releases is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

General notes regarding security reporting

As always, we ask that potential security issues be reported via private email to security@djangoproject.com, and not via Django's Trac instance or the django-developers list. Please see our security policies for further information.

February 03 2020

Django security releases issued: 3.0.3, 2.2.10, and 1.11.28

In accordance with our security release policy, the Django team is issuing Django 3.0.3, Django 2.2.10 and Django 1.11.28. These releases address the security issue detailed below. We encourage all users of Django to upgrade as soon as possible.

Affected supported versions

  • Django master branch
  • Django 3.0
  • Django 2.2
  • Django 1.11

CVE-2020-7471: Potential SQL injection via StringAgg(delimiter)

django.contrib.postgres.aggregates.StringAgg aggregation function was subject to SQL injection, using a suitably crafted delimiter.

Thank you to Simon Charette for the report and patch.

Resolution

Patches to resolve the issue have been applied to Django's master branch and the 3.0, 2.2, and 1.11 release branches. The patches may be obtained from the following changesets:

The following releases have been issued:

The PGP key ID used for these releases is Carlton Gibson: E17DF5C82B4F9D00.

General notes regarding security reporting

As always, we ask that potential security issues be reported via private email to security@djangoproject.com, and not via Django's Trac instance or the django-developers list. Please see our security policies for further information.

January 03 2020

DjangoCon Europe 2020 Announcement

We are happy to announce that DjangoCon Europe 2020 will take place in Porto, Portugal 🇵🇹! The website is already online at 2020.djangocon.eu and it will be kept up to date with the latest updates. Don't forget to follow @djangoconeurope on Twitter.

The dates are already confirmed (don't rush into buying everything so soon because we'll have discounts for DjangoCon attendees!):

  • Conference: May 27-29 (Wednesday-Friday)
  • Sprints/Workshops: May 30 and 31 (Saturday and Sunday)

There is a lot to do, but it's very much worth it – DjangoCon Europe is an extremely friendly, open, inclusive, and informative (for beginners and advanced users alike) conference. Here are some themes and examples of activities and responsibilities that we seek help with:

  • Communications: Press, community relations, announcements, social media, attendee tools, volunteer coordination
  • Support and hospitality: Helpdesk, attendee support contact, visa help, travel management, chat support for attendees, on-site volunteer organization, speaker support
  • Financial Aid: Setup, grant selection, aid organization
  • Sponsors: Outreach to companies, organizing their logistics at the event and other types of visibility
  • Program: Committee work, talk selection, scheduling, session chairs, sprint/open space/keynote/lightning talks session organization
  • Code of Conduct: Drafting documents, handling of requests and issues
  • Diversity advocate: Accessibility considerations, outreach on-site

Join us regardless of your prior experience: this is also an opportunity to learn! In other words, you don't have to be an expert to join. Neither are we experts in hosting such a big event … yet!

Your location prior to the event is not significant. We can do all things that need to be done in Porto ourselves. The only important thing is that you have the energy and free time to help organize a wonderful DjangoCon Europe. The official language of all these prior activities will be English, as well as the conference itself.

Don't be shy 😊. For any inquiries you can email us at 2020@djangocon.eu or chat with us on Slack at DjangoConEurope2020.

January 02 2020

Django bugfix release: 3.0.2

Today we've issued the 3.0.2 bugfix release.

The release package and checksums are available from our downloads page, as well as from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

December 18 2019

Django security releases issued: 3.0.1, 2.2.9, and 1.11.27

In accordance with our security release policy, the Django team is issuing Django 3.0.1, Django 2.2.9 and Django 1.11.27. These release addresses the security issue detailed below. We encourage all users of Django to upgrade as soon as possible.

CVE-2019-19844: Potential account hijack via password reset form

By submitting a suitably crafted email address making use of Unicode characters, that compared equal to an existing user email when lower-cased for comparison, an attacker could be sent a password reset token for the matched account.

In order to avoid this vulnerability, password reset requests now compare the submitted email using the stricter, recommended algorithm for case-insensitive comparison of two identifiers from Unicode Technical Report 36, section 2.11.2(B)(2). Upon a match, the email containing the reset token will be sent to the email address on record rather than the submitted address.

Affected supported versions

  • Django master branch
  • Django 3.0
  • Django 2.2
  • Django 2.1

Resolution

Patches to resolve the issue have been applied to Django's master branch and the 3.0, 2.2, and 1.11 release branches. The patches may be obtained from the following changesets:

The following releases have been issued:

The PGP key ID used for these releases is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

General notes regarding security reporting

As always, we ask that potential security issues be reported via private email to security@djangoproject.com, and not via Django's Trac instance or the django-developers list. Please see our security policies for further information.

This issue was known publicly, therefore we fixed the issue as soon as possible without the usual prenotification process.

December 17 2019

2019 Malcolm Tredinnick Memorial Prize awarded to Jeff Triplett

The Board of the Django Software Foundation is pleased to announce that the 2019 Malcolm Tredinnick Memorial Prize has been awarded to Jeff Triplett (@webology).

Jeff has been heavily involved in the Django Community basically since there was a Django Community. He's served on the Code of Conduct committee for many years but most notably Jeff helped found DEFNA which has run DjangoCon US since 2015. Jeff is also a Board Member of the Python Software Foundation.

Sara Gore, who nominated Jeff, gave this as her main reason for nominating Jeff:

Jeff has served the Django community through the DSF, DEFNA, and the PSF. He turned DjangoCon US into the amazing volunteer run conference that it is today, and mentored many conference organizers and junior developers. He is a true ally who stands up for people in our community.

The other nominees this year were:

  • Trey Hunner
  • Timothy Allen
  • Mariusz Felisiak
  • William Vincent

Every year we receive many nominations and it's always hard to pick the winner. In fact, some people like Jeff have been nominated in multiple years. Malcolm would be very proud of the legacy he has fostered in our community!

Congratulations Jeff!

December 09 2019

2020 DSF Board Election Results

Our 2020 Django Software Foundation Election results are in. The Top 7 candidates are listed below in order of their ranking:

  1. Frank Wiles
  2. Anna Makarudze
  3. James Bennett
  4. William Vincent
  5. Kátia Nakamura
  6. Aaron Bassett
  7. Sayantika Banik

Our new board will take over at the next board meeting where officer positions will be set. Congratulations to the winners and a special thank you to all that stood for this years election.

I would also like to extend a since thanks to retiring Board Members Jessica Deaton, Katie McLaughlin, and Catherine Holmes. Your hard work and dedication is appreciated!

December 02 2019

Django 3.0 Released

The Django team is happy to announce the release of Django 3.0.

The release notes cover the raft of new features in detail, but a few highlights are:

  • Django 3.0 begins our journey to making Django fully async-capable by providing support for running as an ASGI application.
  • Django now officially supports MariaDB 10.1 and higher.
  • Custom enumeration types TextChoices, IntegerChoices, and Choices are now available as a way to define model field choices.

You can get Django 3.0 from our downloads page or from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Carlton Gibson: E17DF5C82B4F9D00.

With the release of Django 3.0, Django 2.2 has reached the end of mainstream support. The final minor bug fix release (which is also a security release), 2.2.8, was issued today. Django 2.2 is an LTS release and will receive security and data loss fixes until April 2022. All users are encouraged to upgrade before then to continue receiving fixes for security issues.

See the downloads page for a table of supported versions and the future release schedule.

Django security releases issued: 2.2.8 and 2.1.15

In accordance with our security release policy, the Django team is issuing Django 2.2.8 and Django 2.1.15. These release addresses the security issue detailed below. We encourage all users of Django to upgrade as soon as possible.

CVE-2019-19118: Privilege escalation in the Django admin.

Since Django 2.1, a Django model admin displaying a parent model with related model inlines, where the user has view-only permissions to a parent model but edit permissions to the inline model, would display a read-only view of the parent model but editable forms for the inline.

Submitting these forms would not allow direct edits to the parent model, but would trigger the parent model's save() method, and cause pre and post-save signal handlers to be invoked. This is a privilege escalation as a user who lacks permission to edit a model should not be able to trigger its save-related signals.

To resolve this issue, the permission handling code of the Django admin interface has been changed. Now, if a user has only the "view" permission for a parent model, the entire displayed form will not be editable, even if the user has permission to edit models included in inlines.

This is a backwards-incompatible change, and the Django security team is aware that some users of Django were depending on the ability to allow editing of inlines in the admin form of an otherwise view-only parent model.

Given the complexity of the Django admin, and in-particular the permissions related checks, it is the view of the Django security team that this change was necessary: that it is not currently feasible to maintain the existing behavior whilst escaping the potential privilege escalation in a way that would avoid a recurrence of similar issues in the future, and that would be compatible with Django's safe by default philosophy.

For the time being, developers whose applications are affected by this change should replace the use of inlines in read-only parents with custom forms and views that explicitly implement the desired functionality. In the longer term, adding a documented, supported, and properly-tested mechanism for partially-editable multi-model forms to the admin interface may occur in Django itself.

Thank you to Shen Ying for reporting this issue.

Affected supported versions

  • Django master branch
  • Django 3.0 (which will be released in a separate blog post later today)
  • Django 2.2
  • Django 2.1

Resolution

Patches to resolve the issue have been applied to Django's master branch and the 3.0, 2.2, and 2.1 release branches. The patches may be obtained from the following changesets:

The following releases have been issued:

The PGP key ID used for these releases is Carlton Gibson: E17DF5C82B4F9D00.

General notes regarding security reporting

As always, we ask that potential security issues be reported via private email to security@djangoproject.com, and not via Django's Trac instance or the django-developers list. Please see our security policies for further information.

November 18 2019

Introducing DjangoCon Africa

Following the huge success of PyCon Africa, the Django community in Africa is ready to bring a new major software event to the continent - the very first DjangoCon Africa! The Django Software Foundation is excited to endorse and support this initiative.

Plans are already in motion for a DjangoCon Africa to be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia in November 2020. Actual dates to be announced as soon as key details are in place.

DjangoCon Africa will include 3 days of single-track talks, 1 day of workshops and sprints, and another day for touring for international visitors.

The event will also include a Django Girls workshop to be held the weekend before DjangoCon Africa. To make the conference as inclusive as possible, the event will offer financial aid to members of under-represented communities in software to ensure they can also attend.

The CFP, which is open to all, will also be announced as soon as key details are in place.

About Ethiopia

Ethiopia is a country in North East of Africa, commonly known as the Horn of Africa. It is a country with a rich history and many historical places to visit. The country is highly accessible to all, with African Union members having the option of applying for visa on arrival at Bole International Airport or applying for an e-visa like the rest of the world before traveling to Ethiopia.

The country also boasts of the largest airline in the whole of Africa, with the country’s airline, Ethiopian Airlines having 53 routes in Africa, 17 in Europe, 7 in the Americas, 14 in Asia and 10 in the Middle East. This makes this country very accessible to all of Africa and the rest of the world and hence an ideal location for the first DjangoCon Africa.

See you in Addis Ababa in November 2020 for the first ever DjangoCon Africa!

Django 3.0 release candidate 1 released

Django 3.0 release candidate 1 is the final opportunity for you to try out the raft of new features before Django 3.0 is released.

The release candidate stage marks the string freeze and the call for translators to submit translations. Provided no major bugs are discovered that can't be solved in the next two weeks, Django 3.0 will be released on or around December 2. Any delays will be communicated on the django-developers mailing list thread.

Please use this opportunity to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker). You can grab a copy of the package from our downloads page or on PyPI.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

November 04 2019

Django bugfix releases issued: 2.2.7, 2.1.14, and 1.11.26

Today we've issued 2.2.7, 2.1.14, and 1.11.26 bugfix releases.

The release package and checksums are available from our downloads page, as well as from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Mariusz Felisiak: 2EF56372BA48CD1B.

October 24 2019

2020 DSF Board Nominations

It is that time of year again to think about next year’s Django Software Foundation’s Board of Directors!

As you know, the Board guides the direction of the marketing, governance and outreach activities of the Django community. We provide funding, resources, and guidance to Django events on a global level. Further we provide support to the Django community with an established Code of Conduct and make decisions and enforcement recommendations for violations. We work closely with our corporate and individual members to raise funds to help support our great community.

In order for our community to continue to grow and advance the Django Web framework, we need your help. The Board of Directors consists of volunteers who are elected to one year terms. This is an excellent opportunity to help advance Django. We can’t do it without volunteers, such as yourself. For the most part, the time commitment is a few hours per month. There has been some confusion on this in the past, but anyone including current Board members, DSF Members, or the public at large can apply to the Board. It is open to all.

If you are interested in helping to support the development of Django we’d enjoy receiving your application for the Board of Directors. Please fill out the application form by Friday, November 22nd, 2019 to be considered. If it is still the 22nd of November somewhere in the world, applications will remain open.

If you have any questions about applying, the work, or the process in general please don’t hesitate to reach out via email to foundation@djangoproject.com and one of us will get back with you shortly.

Thank you for your time and we look forward to working with you in 2020.

The 2019 DSF Board of Directors

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